Not getting new Prospects? Give your Email a Facelift


Not getting new Prospects - Give your Email a Facelift

Email Marketing dwells in a fierce battlefield where hundreds of businesses shoot emails towards every company they come across with. Sometimes we tend to forget about the competition that we become contented with mediocre emails and then wonder why we never get positive responses from prospects.

Emails need to stand out in order to gain attention and ignite a spark of conversation. If your current email template is outdated and unattractive, you need to consider a complete makeover and see how significantly it affects prospect responses.

Here are a few things you could incorporate to give your emails a whole new look:

Go for crisp and short. Perhaps it’s high time for you to shy away from the usual lengthy content and switch to something that’s concise yet abundant with substance. Get rid of wordy paragraphs and tall tales. Emphasize only the important things, based on the target industry and your own company’s goals. Put it in perspective: whenever you receive an email from a marketer, what are the parts that you would normally skip?

The message is WOW. Within a few seconds and after the first several lines, your prospects must already realize why they should keep on reading your email. Keep it casual and try not to be too official-sounding with your choice of words. By understanding your target market carefully, you can come up with strong statements that would generally get their attention and make them think afterwards that their time was not wasted.

Encourage correspondence. Although it may sound like the ultimate goal of email marketing itself, what it means is that you should push for something that would make them write back for good reasons. Ask questions. Make them share opinions. Allow them to participate in polls. Give them anything thatdoesn’t entail signing them up for a commitment they don’t really like. Some marketers even use Gmail instead of their corporate email to give a more personal approach in communicating with their prospects.

Be careful with action buttons. Just like you, prospects don’t want to be deceived, or to feel they are being deceived. If you really need to include action buttons in your emails, make sure you specify clearly what they would do for the prospect. Don’t write “Get a Free Demo” if what the button really does is to route them to a page where they have to fill-out an enormous form. They would appreciate the honesty if you just put exactly what it’s for.

Accessorize, but with relevance. Links can help shorten an email, but putting unnecessary URLs or other external addresses can also smear its overall appearance. Only provide links to useful content, such as industry information, subscription pages, or social media connections.

Fast follow. Don’t wait for 48 hours to check on the progress of an email campaign. Draft a follow-up system that regularly (preferably within a 24-hour period) monitors development for possible responses and to normalize an already-established line of communication.